Bioplasmonics Group

Group

Somin Eunice Lee, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Biomedical Engineering

Professor Somin Eunice Lee received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Davis and a Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley as a Siebel Scholar. She was among the first to demonstrate optical gene silencing, and she showed that gene circuits in living cells can be precisely controlled using plasmonic nanoantennas. She then completed her postdoctoral studies at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as an NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein Postdoctoral Fellow, where she explored secreted single molecules within their local cellular microenvironment using plasmonic approaches. She is currently an Assistant Professor in Electrical & Computer Engineering Department and an affiliated Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department. She is the recipient of the 2015 NSF CAREER Award. Her research interests lie in advancing innovations in nanoscale-dependent properties to enable unique spatial and temporal capabilities needed for quantification in bioscience and medicine.

Yunbo Liu

Graduate Student

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Yunbo Liu received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received is M.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. He is currently a doctoral student in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. His research interests lie in developing nanoplasmonic-enabled methodologies with high-spatial and high-temporal control for biological systems.

Allison O’Hara

Undergraduate Student

Biomedical Engineering Department

Allison O'Hara is currently a junior undergraduate student in the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. She has been recognized as a 2015 Marian Sarah Parker Scholar. Her research interests lie in the development of therapeutic drug delivery through multifunctional nanomaterials.